Détails d'une promesse

To ensure that the (Access to Information Act) system continues to serve Canadians, we will undertake a full legislative review of the Access to Information Act every five years.

Trudeau polimetre
Promesse en voie de réalisation ou partiellement réalisée

Real Change: A New Plan For a Strong Middle Class (page 24)


JUSTIFICATION

August 2019 - This promise is considered broken because the first review of the Access to Information Act will take place one year after the law comes into force, which means after the current government’smandate ends. Promises must be kept within the duration of the mandate.


SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS

July 09, 2019 - “Under the new Access to Information Act, the government is required to initiate a review of the Act within one year of Royal Assent of Bill C-58, and every five years afterwards. The first full review of the Act will enable the government to build on the targeted changes made in Bill C-58. Parliamentary committees will also initiate a review of the Act within one year of Royal Assent of Bill C-58 and every five years afterwards, and issue their recommendations for changes.” - The Access to Information Act - Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

May 05, 2019C-58  An Act to amend the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts (Third Reading in the Senate)

September 28, 2018 - "The Halifax-based Centre for Law and Democracy and human rights organization Access Info Europe published the list to mark International Right to Know Day..(...) The compilers of the list say they hope Canada's "poor showing" will be a wake-up call that spurs Ottawa to improve the federal Access to Information Act, which hasn't been significantly updated since its inception in 1983." - Canada slips to 55th place in global freedom-of-information law rankings - CTV News

August 01, 2018 - "In her special report, the Information Commissioner notes that this provision allows the government to lead the review. “This is not the same as a parliamentary committee, made up of members of all the recognized parties in the House of Commons.” She adds that the proposed measure “is atypical for legislative review clauses and gives no deadline for when the government's review should be completed.” 70 For these reasons, the Commissioner recommends instead that “[t]here should be mandatory parliamentary review of the Access to Information Act.” - Legislative Summary of Bill C-58: An Act to amend the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts - Chloé Forget et Maxime-Olivier Thibodeau, Library of Parliament

August 01, 2018 - “New section 93 provides that the designated minister (the President of the Treasury Board) shall undertake a review of the ATIA within one year after the day on which new section 93 comes into force, and every five years afterwards. He or she shall also cause a report to be laid before each House of Parliament.” - Legislative Summary of Bill C-58: An Act to amend the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts - Library of Parliament

February 27, 2018 - "Enhancing the capacity of the Office of the Information Commissioner to resolve complaints about the handling of public access to information requests ($2.9 million in 2018– 19 to the Office of the Information Commissioner). This funding reinforces the Government’s commitment to openness and transparency concerning access to information" - Equality Growth - A Strong Middle Class, Budget 2018-2019,  p.197 - Government of Canada

January 23, 2018Five-year review of the Act - Government of Canada

June 2017 - "In media articles, the President of the Treasury Board added “important considerations” for delaying access reform, such as “the neutrality of the public service” and “the independence of the judiciary”. " - Access to Information Act reform: A broken promise? In The Annual Report 2016-2017 - Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada

March 22, 2017 - "a distinct Indigenous Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, will be created in cooperation with Indigenous partners. The distinct Indigenous framework will reflect the unique cultures and needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children across Canada." - Building a strong middle class, Budget 2017-2018, p.132 - Government of Canada

Partager sur les médias sociaux: